CarsDirect review: 2014 Scion iQ

Like with the CarsDirect Ford Focus review I posted before, the Scion iQ review was written to give an overview of the car and its changes over the years, different model variations (of which there technically are none), and cars which one might also look at.

Here’s the original text I sent in.

Scion’s diminutive iQ model reaches it’s third production year for 2014, with little changes.  There are less colors available for 2014 than the 2013 model, and a few minor options and accessories missing as well (so long, cargo tote— car collectors write that down).  Also noted for collectors, all Scions celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Toyota branch with a special “Silver Ignition” paint, and an adornment of lighting fixtures inside and outside of the vehicles.

Inside the iQ, you find that the four seats are more like three and a shelf.  Exterior size being a great way to fool a passer-by, a six-foot passenger with a 32-inch inseam (important, as not all 6-footers are alike) can sit in the one useable back seat with an equally proportioned six-footer directly in front of them.  This is acceptable at least around town.  This party trick is due in part to the engine being mounted farther forward of the front wheels than usual, thus putting the front passenger slightly ahead of the driver.  Another way Toyota’s youth division accomplished this feat was removing the conventional glove-box in the dash, in favor of a hidden slide-out drawer under the front passenger seat.

With more clever engineering, the Scion kills two map-lights with one swiveling LED lamp, letting whoever needs the illumination have it.  The iQ also has a surprisingly supple leather-wrapped steering wheel; welcome in this class and $16,000 price point.

The iQ is a single-trim vehicle, but can be optioned out with two sets of wheel covers for the standard 16” steel wheels, or for about $700 one can adorn their car with swanky 16” aluminum wheels, though the 175mm wide tires remain the same.  Foglights can also be equipped, and for those wanting a little more fun with their iQ there’s even Toyota Racing Development (TRD) sway bars and springs that lower and stiffen the car.

Like before, the iQ commences down the road via a 1.3L inline-four good for 94 surprisingly growly horses, and 89 foot-pounds of torque.  Making the best of that power is a CVT transmission.  While no rocket ship, the iQ does get along well enough in town, and the fuel economy ratings are nearly matching each other for city/highway with 36/37 EPA ratings.

Chevy Spark
The only city-car in America sold with rear doors, the Spark adds convenience competitors don’t.  Spark gives a choice of manual or automatic transmission while most hold to just automated.  Weaknesses include not being the most powerful in the class, and economy is good but with wider gap for consumption ratings compared to some smaller competitors.

The Alternatives

Fiat 500
The 500 is the powerhouse of the city cars, with a 101-horsepower engine.  It also stands out as the cute one out of more aggressively angled small cars with more pumped up fenders.  Regardless of the power, the 500 still yields good fuel economy and choices between a manual or automatic transmission.

Toyota Yaris
A big brother of the Scion iQ, the Yaris has similar equipment in a larger package.  It lacks the tight turning circle or better city mpg, but the highway mpg matches the iQ, and is more at home on the open road for those who find themselves out of town more often.

smart fortwo
The fortwo is the grandparent for this class.  The similar Scion iQ seats more people, and regardless of more power and size, the iQ still bests the Smart for turning circle and economy—the Smart also requires premium fuel.  Fortwo’s tight exterior size still wins for parking, but it’s not just the all-lowercase name that makes the smart seem not-so.

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